The Lending Coach

Coaching and teaching - many through the mortgage process and others on the field

A True Mortgage Approval Before a Purchase – The “TBD” Underwrite

In today’s competitive real estate market, potential home-buyers need every advantage they can get.

One way to differentiate your offer from the myriad of others is a true “TBD underwritten” loan approval. 

I’m not talking about the typical pre-qualification letter that is a cursory overview of a borrower’s ability to gain an approval, but a fully underwritten approval that is only waiting for a contract.

This process is for the home-buyer who wants a solid, iron clad pre-approval that has been fully underwritten and signed off by mortgage underwriters. 

How does that work?

Well, it works very similarly to a full-fledged underwrite – except the address is left blank – or “TBD” (to be determined).  The underwriter analyzes the file as if it was a true loan – and provides the actual loan conditions that the borrower must meet.

What’s the downside?

The only real downside is time.  This process could take as long as a few weeks, because all documentation needs to be gathered (tax returns, W2s, pay stubs, bank statements, etc.) and then analyzed by the underwriter.

What’s the advantage?

There are a multitude of advantages.  First and foremost, the borrower will know the exact size of the mortgage that they will be able to qualify for.  They will have a very good idea of the monthly payment and be assured that the loan will go through.

Equally important, the offer you submit will essentially be like a cash offer.  The real estate agent presenting the offer will share with the seller’s agent that the mortgage approval is actually confirmed – not pre-qualified.  This will make your offer much more attractive to the sellers, as they don’t have to be concerned about mortgage approval.

Finally, the closing can take place more quickly than standard financed transactions.  Essentially all that’s needed is an appraisal to confirm the value of the property.  Instead of a 30 to 45 day close, these can be done in less than 20!

In Conclusion

If you know that you will be purchasing a home in the near future, ask your mortgage lender about a “TBD approval” to see if that’s an option.  If so, I highly recommend that you go through the process early – and in that way you will be miles ahead of your buying competition!

Please do reach out to me for more information, as I can absolutely help you with a “TBD” underwrite!

Mortgage Options for Newly Self Employed Borrowers

Self-employed mortgage applicants must prove stability of employment and income, traditionally going back at least two years.  This regulation is a bit tougher than it is for regular salaried employees.

Traditionally, mortgage lenders have required two years federal income tax returns in securing a mortgage for purchasing or refinancing real estate. 

Fortunately, there is a way to use just one year of tax returns to qualify for a mortgage. 

This can help newer business owners, as well as those who experienced a down year in the past.

Introducing Two-X Flex 1-Year

Finance of America Mortgage has a new, proprietary product that drastically reduces the amount of documents and simplifies qualification. 

Two-X Flex 1-year requires only one year of income documentation and offers borrowers more flexibility in qualifying for a mortgage.   

Product Details

  • 1-year of income documentation used for qualifying
  • Wage earner and self-employed borrowers
  • Up to 90% loan-to-value with no mortgage insurance
  • As low as 640 minimum FICO
  • $100,000 minimum loan amount
  • Up to $3,000,000 maximum loan amount
  • 30 year fixed
  • 5/1, 7/1 and 10/1 ARM –fully amortizing and interest only
  • Primary Residence, Second Homes, Investment Properties
  • Up to 50% debt-to-income ratio
  • 1-2 units, PUD and warrantable condos

In order to utilize this one-year requirement, it’s important to understand that your tax return must reflect a full year of self-employment income.

For example, if you became self-employed in April 2017, that year’s tax returns are not going to reflect a full year.  If you started your business in November 2016, then your 2018 tax returns will demonstrate a full year of experience running your business.

Give me a call to find out more – as there are multiple alternatives that we can examine!

It’s Easier to Qualify for a Mortgage Than You Might Think

One of the largest misconceptions that potential borrowers have about buying a home is that it’s too tough to qualify for a mortgage.

Qualification can be a lengthy process, to be sure, but it isn’t impossible by any stretch.

Think about it this way…people buy homes every day, and many borrowers don’t have the perfect situations. 

Erik J. Martin from The Mortgage Reports has put together an interesting piece that I’ve linked to here.  I highly recommend you take a look at it – and I’ve summarized some of it in this article.

Don’t Overthink the Perceived Difficulty

Believe it or not, most potential borrowers with a reliable job, that have regular income, and average credit can most likely qualify for a mortgage.  Of course, there are specific regulations that must be met, but qualification isn’t as tough as many might think.

Interestingly, many potential buyers willing to own a home don’t even try to qualify for a mortgage. Many believe that rigid mortgage requirements will disqualify them.

Per Martin’s article: “new research indicates that consumers think it’s harder to qualify for a mortgage loan than it actually is. And many lack the facts and know-how to properly pursue home financing.”

He continues: “don’t rule out buying a home because you think you’re ineligible for a loan. Chances are that, armed with knowledge and the right guidance, you can buy that home you’ve been thinking about.”

Report: Consumers believe guidelines are tougher than they really are

Martin references the study from Fannie Mae that recently polled 3,000 consumers about their understanding of mortgage requirement rules. Some findings were surprising:

  • Only 11 percent were aware that the minimum FICO credit score needed to obtain a mortgage is 580. Most thought it was 650.
  • Over 40 percent didn’t know their own credit score.
  • Most people think you need to put down at least 10 percent for a down payment. The truth is, the median is 3 percent; some programs don’t even require a down payment.
  • Only 23 percent of respondents were aware that low down payment programs are available.
  • Over three in five didn’t know that the debt-to-income ratio lenders don’t want total debt payments to exceed is 50 percent.
  • Only 12 percent of homeowners and 9 percent of renters were able to identify the correct credit score range needed to qualify for a mortgage.
  • The top five reasons cited for expected difficulty in getting a mortgage were
    • Insufficient income (chosen by 23% of respondents)
    • Too much debt (17%)
    • Insufficient credit score/credit history (15%)
    • Affording the down payment or closing costs (14%)
    • Lack of job security/stability (9%)

One more thing regarding those who would rather rent than buy…the report intimates that these are the people are most unclear about mortgage requirements.

My guess is that this uncertainty is holding them back from learning more details or reaching for a goal that seems to difficult.

Give it a Try!

More often than not, there are two things get in the way of buyers seeking a mortgage: their own fears and lack of info about mortgage requirements.

There are many things potential borrowers can do – one of the first is finding out your FICO credit score.  You can find more on that here….

Most importantly, reach out to a trustworthy lender and go through the mortgage application process.

When talking with your lender, make sure to ask about different loan options – and find out what you qualify for. Learn what your minimum down payment and credit score need to be.

Determine how much you’ll pay monthly and over the course of a given loan. Your lender can also talk with you about the particular requirements for that particular loan.

Please do reach out to me, as it would be my pleasure to help!

Using Gift Money for Your Down Payment

Saving for a down payment can be one of the most important and most challenging facets of buying a home. The larger the down payment, the lower your loan amount – and that results in a lower monthly payment, a lower interest rate in many cases, and it could help you to avoid mortgage insurance. 

But, there are some out there that can get around bringing in a large down payment. Many have family members or others who are willing to help them out – and that’s when “gifting” comes into play.

The Gift Letter

Borrowers can get help from parents or other people that care about them, but they will need to get a signed statement from that giver that the money is, in fact, a gift and not a third-party loan.

The mortgage gift letter must include the giver’s name, address and contact information, as well as the banking information of that particular account, as well as the recipient’s name and relationships to the giver and the dollar amount.

In most cases the lender will have a template letter that will help you with this step.

A Key Piece – Documenting the Gift

When putting together the gift letter, the giver needs to include documentation of where that gift is coming from – this is extremely important

For instance, the lender will most likely need to see a bank statement or other form of proof verifying that the donor has the money to provide that gift and/or paperwork showing an electronic transfer between the donor’s account and yours.

If the person gifting the funds is selling shares of stock or other investments to provide the cash for a down payment, the giver will need a statement from their brokerage account showing that transaction.

Most importantly, as a borrower, you don’t want to add the gift funds with any of your other finances. Doing so could complicate the paper trail and cause the lender to reject the gift altogether. 

It’s easiest to have the giver wire the money straight to escrow at closing – that way there are no issues with documenting the gift.

Rules and Limits On Gifts

You might assume that you can just use whatever financial gifts your loved ones give you for a down payment, but using gift money is not as simple as you might think. The source of the funds in your bank account, and the givers, will matter just as much as how much money you actually have.

Secondly, the amount of down payment funds that can be gifted depends on the type of mortgage loan involved. If you’re getting an FHA loan with a 3.5% down payment, for instance, the entire down payment can be a gift.

On the other hand, if you’re using a conventional Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loan, the entire down payment can only be a gift if you’re putting down 20% or more of the home’s purchase price. If your down payment is less than 20%, some of the money has to come from the borrower. 

These rules are subject to change based on lending regulations, so check with your mortgage lender to make sure that you transaction qualifies for the use of gift funds.

Primary Residences

If a borrower is purchasing a primary residence, they can use gift funds for their down payment. These following regulations apply:

  • If it’s a single-family home, you can use gift funds without having to contribute any of your own money to your down payment.
  • If it’s a multi-family home, you can get a home without having to contribute to the down payment as long as the down payment is 20% or more. If the down payment is 20% or less on a multi-unit home, you have to contribute at least 5% of your own funds to your down payment.

Second Homes

For a second home purchase, the following regulations apply regarding gifts and gift limits:

  • If you’re making a down payment of 20% or more, all funding for the down payment can come from the gift.
  • If it’s less than 20%, then 5% of your down payment must come from your own funds.

Investment Properties

Gift funds cannot be used toward the down payment on any investment property.

Who Can Gift a Down Payment?

Depending on the type of loan, there are different regulations on who may give a down payment gift.

Conventional Loans (Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac)

A conventional loan through Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac means the gift must to come from a family member. Per their regulations, family is defined as:

  • Spouse
  • Parent (including step and foster)
  • Grandparent (including great, step and foster)
  • Aunt/uncle (including great and step)
  • Niece/nephew (including step)
  • Cousin (including step and adopted)
  • In-laws (including parents, grandparents, aunt/uncle, brother- and sister-in-law)
  • Child (including step, foster and adopted)
  • Sibling (including step, foster and adopted)
  • Domestic partner
  • Fiancé

FHA Loans

With FHA loans, the list is nearly identical to the conventional rules, including future in-laws. But, some restrictions do apply – so do check with your lender for details.

While cousins, nieces and nephews aren’t able to give your gift under normal family guidelines with an FHA loan, the FHA does allow for gifts from close friends who have a clear interest in your life. This can include extended family like cousins, nieces and nephews and even former spouses.

In addition to the ‘close friend’ guideline, the FHA also allows for gifts from the following:

  • Employer
  • Labor union
  • Charitable organization

Finally, you can receive funds from a government agency or public entity that provides homeownership assistance to low-to-moderate income or first-time home buyers.

In Conclusion

Please reach out to me for more information on gifts and mortgage qualification, as it would be my pleasure to help you!

Can I Purchase a House with No Closing Costs?

Let’s get this straight and right up front: every real estate transaction will have closing costs – title fees, origination fees for a loan (if you need to finance the property), and recording fees, just to name a few.

So, how can a buyer purchase a house without actually paying those closing costs? Well, read on for more!

What this really means is that the closing charges are folded into the loan balance — if the house can appraise for the selling price plus the closing costs.

And there are pros and cons to doing this, as will be highlight later.

It’s also likely that not every single closing cost can be rolled into your loan. The buyer will most likely still be required to pay some fees at the settlement table. Those specifics will vary by lender.

I’m linking to a fantastic article by Hal Bundrick at Nerdwallet – he’s a personal finance writer as well as a certified financial planner.  You can find the entire article here…but I’ve highlighted a few excerpts:

What Are Closing Costs?

 “Closing costs” is a collective term for the various fees and charges you’ll encounter when buying a home. Some of these fees come from the lender and others come from third parties that are involved in the transaction, like home appraisers, homeowner associations (HOAs), and title companies.

How much are closing costs usually?

On average, homebuyers pay closing costs ranging from 2% to 5% of the purchase price. Unfortunately, this is only a ballpark figure, as there are many variables in each individual transaction. You can find out more specifics on closing costs here…

Many lenders will require that you apply for a loan prior to receiving a more precise estimate of closing costs; however, some lenders are more transparent with their available options and will do the necessary legwork to provide you a better idea of those costs.

Can you buy a house with no closing costs?

The reality is that closing costs have to be paid one way or the other – and by some or all parties in the transaction. Your decision will be whether you pay them with cash when you sign your loan, or as an added expense in each monthly mortgage payment.

How a no closing cost purchase works – it’s all in the financing

Per Bundrick in his article: “lenders can structure no closing cost loans in two ways. The differences between them are subtle, yet the result is the same.”

  1. You finance the closing costs. In this case, the lender will add your closing costs to your total loan balance. Your monthly payments will be slightly higher, and you’ll be paying these closing costs, with interest, for the full term of your loan — so, for example, over a period of 15 or 30 years.
  • The lender will absorb the closing costs in exchange for a higher interest rate. Again, you’ll pay a bit more each month, and your total interest cost will be greater over the life of the loan.

Either way, your monthly payment rises slightly. You’ll pay less at the closing table, but more over the long term.

Is a no closing cost mortgage a good idea?

The answer is….it depends!

If you are a little low on cash and have found your dream home, then yes – rolling $4,000 to $8,000 into your mortgage is a good idea.  It won’t increase your monthly payment by much and generally doesn’t impact qualification.

Also, if you plan on moving, selling, or refinancing in the short term, wrapping your closing costs into the balance can be a good strategy.

However, if you’re going to live in your new home for the long-term, you will pay more over the life of the loan by financing your closing costs or accepting a higher interest rate.

So if this is your forever home and you plan on keeping the mortgage for 7+ years, it’s probably best to pay the closing costs up front.

A Must for Pitchers – The ZB Velocity Program

I’ve got a really good friend that does some excellent work with pitchers – his name is Jordan Zimmerman – and he runs a program called ZB Velocity that is helping players get stronger, throw harder, and stay healthier!

This program isn’t about using weighted balls and focusing solely on arm strength. Instead, its a holistic approach to strengthening the core along with proper mechanics that brings about a noticeable change in velocity.

Why ZB Velocity?

Many of his players see an increase in 3 to 5 miles-per-hour after an 8 week session with ZB Velo – and more importantly, these pitchers are staying healthy because of it!

I’d invite you to click on the video below to take a look at what Jordan and his group are doing….

I highly recommend reaching out to Jordan to find out more – his contact information is here.

From ZB’s Facebook site:

April 2016 was the launch date of their DVD set and online video series of pitching instruction, velocity training and other baseball related product. ZB Velocity is now offering individual and group pitching instruction to youth, high school and collegiate players.

Below is a list of what is currently offered:

One on one instruction
Group instruction
Video analysis
Speed and conditioning training
Strength training
Arm health
Velocity training
Pitch grips
Mental side of the game
College recruitment

Jordan is a retired MLB pitcher and played 11 years of professional baseball before his official retirement in 2005. Prior to his arrival in professional baseball, Jordan played for the Canadian National Team multiple times.

He was drafted out of high school by the Los Angeles Dodgers but decided that going to college was the smarter choice at that time. While attending Blinn College, Jordan received All State and National awards as a pitcher. In 1995 he was drafted and signed by the Seattle Mariners. In 1999, Jordan got the official phone call and was called up to the Major Leagues with the Mariners.

Today Jordan resides in Surprise, AZ with his wife Jennifer and 4 children. He is the owner of ZB Velocity strength training and the pitching coach for Shadow Ridge High School.

Contact ZB Velocity

You can find out more on Jordan and ZB Velocity here, here and here – and I highly recommend reaching out to him if you, or anyone you know, is a pitcher and is looking for proper mechanics and strengthening!

The Top 10 Mortgage Questions a Borrower Should Ask

It’s a good idea to put together a list of questions to ask potential lenders in order find out which one will be best for you. These and other questions should help you choose the right lender and the best home loan.

How do I obtain pre-approval?

One of the best ways to ensure a smooth home buying process is what you do before you begin your home search.

Mortgage pre-approval, without the pressure of a closing date, is easier than trying to engineer a full approval from the ground up. And having a pre-approved mortgage means you can close faster when you’re ready to buy.

Ask the lender what documentation they need and what processes they have in place to secure and automated underwriting approval.  If they can’t provide that information, find another lender!  You can find out more about the pre-approval process here….

Which type of mortgage is best for me?

This question will help you know if you’re talking to someone who wants to sell you a loan quickly — or a trusted loan advisor who will be looking out for your best interest.

When you ask, “What are my options?” for a particular type of loan, the mortgage lender should dive deeper into your situation and ask YOU questions about your financial goals.  You can really gauge the professionalism of the lender by the questions he/she asks.

What’s your communication style?

Mortgage lenders can communicate with you in multiple ways – including by phone, email and text. Some are tech savvy and others prefer traditional methods.

The point is to be clear about what you prefer.

If you respond more quickly to text messages versus voicemail – tell your loan officer. Often times, there are time sensitive issues that arise during the loan process, so it will make everyone happy if your loan officer knows how to get questions answered, additional documentation etc. in a timely manner.

How often will I be updated on the loan’s progress?

You should be introduced to all parties that will be involved with your loan – from the originator, to the processor, and any other assistants.  Have their contact information handy during the loan process.

And how will you be updated on the progress: by email, phone or an online portal?  How often?

I recommend that you share your service expectations upfront, and check to see if the lender you are working with has these types of processes in place that meet your requirements.  If not, move on!

How much down payment will I need?

A 20% down payment may be nice, but borrowers have multiple choices. Qualified buyers can find mortgages with as little as 3% down, or even no down payment, depending on the property location.

Again, there are considerations for every down payment option and the best lenders will take the time to walk you through the choices, based on your stated goals. You can find out more about down payment requirements here….

Will I have to pay mortgage insurance?

If you put down less than 20%, the answer will probably be “Yes.” Even if the mortgage insurance is “lender paid,” it’s likely passed on as a cost built into your mortgage payment, which increases your rate and monthly payment.

You’ll want to know just how much mortgage insurance will cost and if it’s an upfront or ongoing charge, or both.  You can find out more about mortgage insurance here….

Are You Equipped to Approve Loans In-House?

Underwriters review loans and issue conditions before approving or rejecting a loan. Ask if the lender handles its own underwriting and does their own approvals.  This can be a make or break proposition if you need to close the loan in a timely fashion.

What other costs will I pay at closing?

Fees that are charged by third parties, such as for an appraisal, a title search, property taxes and other closing costs, will be paid at the loan signing. These costs will be detailed in your official Loan Estimate document and your almost-time-to-sign Closing Disclosure.

Your lender should be absolutely upfront regarding this. You can find out more about closing costs here….

How long until my loan closes?

Of course, you want to know what your target closing and move-in dates are so you can make preparations. And just as important: Ask what you should avoid doing in the meantime — like buying new furniture on credit and other loan-busting behavior.

Is there anything that can delay my closing?

Well, buying a home is a complex process with many stages and requirements. While delays are normal, the best way to avoid them is to stay in touch with your lender and provide the most up-to-date documentation as quickly as you can.  If you have any past credit issues or job related changes, let your lender know immediately to avoid any last minute delays.

5 Things Real Estate Agents Should Know About Mortgages

Unless all of your clients are cash buyers, mortgages are an integral part of any real estate agent’s business. Knowing some basics about mortgages will make you a better adviser to your clients and a more effective agent.

With that in mind, here’s a brief list of topics that real estate agents should understand in order to best help and advise their clients.

Although it is by no means necessary to become a mortgage expert, the following five mortgage insights will increase your value as a real estate professional.

The minimum down payment is not 20%

Most agents already know this, but a 20% down payment is the amount necessary for a buyer to avoid paying private mortgage insurance (referred to as PMI) on the loan.  There are many conventional loan programs require as little as 5% down.

For first-time homebuyers, recent conventional loan programs introduced to the market allow buyers to get a loan with only 3% down. If you work primarily with first-time homebuyers, you should also be aware of down payment assistance programs offered by local governments and municipalities.

You can find more about down payment options here….and here

Even move-up buyers should get a mortgage pre-approval

Many of the first-time buyers I work with get pre-approved so they know how much they can afford to spend on their new home. But not all realtors encourage move-up buyers to seek pre-approval, and I think they should.

The situation may have changed from the time their clients originally took out a mortgage. Even if they’ve built up a lot of equity, it may not help the buyer if their income or credit is not aligned with the price of the property they hope to buy.

Oftentimes, people who have qualified for a mortgage at one time are surprised by new and current restrictions and underwriting standards. For this reason, real estate agents should encourage their clients to speak with a mortgage broker even if the client thinks they already know the ropes.

This can help avoid surprises or disappointment further down the line and save time for agents and their clients.

Shopping around for a mortgage will not hurt your credit score

Shopping around for a mortgage with multiple lenders is highly recommended, and even though credit inquiries do impact a borrower’s credit score, there is an exception when it comes to credit inquiries from mortgage lenders.

All such inquiries made in the 30-day period prior to scoring your credit are usually ignored. Furthermore, inquiries outside of that 30-day period that fall within a typical shopping period are counted as only one inquiry.

You can find out more on multiple credit pulls here….

Condos have special underwriting requirements

If you’re working on a condo deal, it is in your and your client’s best interest to work closely with the mortgage loan officer to make sure the property meets the lender’s underwriting criteria. This is typically done through a condo questionnaire.

If you are the seller and state on your listing that the property can be conventionally financed, I highly recommend that you have the HOA documentation ready for the prospective buyer.

Among other things, they will be looking out for things such as pending litigation against the condo association, the percentage of units that are owner-occupied and whether any part of the building is used for commercial activity.

Many condo transactions are either seriously delayed or completely derailed by last-minute surprises that should have been discovered early in the process.

You can find out the specifics about condo warrantability here

Advertised rates aren’t always available

Some realtors encourage their clients to shop around for rates at the last minute or promise mortgage interest rates to clients that they have seen online. This can often lead to frustration because not everyone will qualify for those advertised, ultra-low promo rates and there may be additional stipulations such as a quick closing or mortgage insurance.

That’s why I personally don’t promise rates until I have a completed application and all supporting documents. No two files are the same, so it’s best not to promise something over which we have no control.

There is a lot more to know when it comes to mortgages – and like I stated early, there’s no reason to become a mortgage guru! With that said, these five tips will help you look like a more that capable advisor in the eyes of your clients.

If you have other questions or would like to dive deeper into any of these topics, don’t hesitate to reach out to me!

Home Buyers and Mortgage Seekers – Beware of Online Credit Reports

U.S. Air Force illustration/Senior Airman Grace Lee

Many consumers are shocked to find out that their Credit Karma or other online scores do not match their true FICO score when it’s finally run by their mortgage lender.

This happens quite often – and it’s important to understand the differences and reach out to your mortgage professional first. 

Unfortunately, many would-be buyers have an incorrect view of their actual credit worthiness and begin looking at homes too soon in the process.

To repeat, the key thing to remember here is to reach out to your mortgage professional to get your official FICO score.

Dive Deeper

I’d invite you to find out the particulars here – as the free online credit products and the FICO score used in mortgage qualification process are noticeably different.  Essentially, they use different algorithms to come up with their own score. 

Most lenders determine a borrower’s creditworthiness based on FICO® scores, a Credit Score developed by Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO™). This score tells the lender what type of credit risk you are and what your interest rate should be to reflect that risk.

FICO scores have different names at each of the three major United States credit reporting companies. And there are different versions of the FICO formula. Here are the specific versions of the FICO formula used by mortgage lenders:

  • Equifax Beacon 5.0
  • Experian/Fair Isaac Risk Model v2
  • TransUnion FICO Risk Score 04

The Key Takeaway

The major takeaway is that your Credit Karma score will be different than your FICO score…and in most cases, the free, online score is better than the FICO score – at least that has been my experience.

Also, you can find out here how your credit score affects your mortgage rate – this is also worth the read!

Delayed Financing – A Great Purchase and Financing Option

Paying cash for a house has its advantages. Purchasing with cash rather than getting a mortgage could help you as the buyer win a bidding war when buying a new home. You may even be able to negotiate a lower price on the home if you’re paying cash.

After all, cash in hand is a sure thing, and a mortgage approval can take some time and isn’t always guaranteed.

Delayed financing is a specific program that allows the buyer to take cash out on a property immediately in order to cover the purchase price and closing costs for a property they had just purchased with cash.

How Delayed Financing Works

Delayed financing is a mortgage that is originated on a property after you already own it, in comparison to a typical mortgage that is used for the acquisition of a property. The delayed financing mortgage option allow buyers to compete with all-cash buyers when purchasing the property. 

By financing the property after the initial cash transaction, the borrower/buyer is able to regain their liquidity because the money isn’t tied up in the house after the delayed financing is completed.

Keep in mind that the value of the property might not the same as the purchase price. Borrowers will need an appraisal done by their new lender to determine the value.  Moreover, your new loan can’t be more than what you paid for the property plus your closing costs and lender fees.

Why Delayed Financing?

Delayed financing is generally helpful for:

  • Investors who want to compete with all-cash buyers’ short timelines
  • Investors who want to have more bargaining power because they’re paying with cash
  • A property that has multiple offers and the seller doesn’t want to wait on financing
  • Investment properties, vacation homes, and primary residences
  • An investor who wants to take their cash out and buy another investment property

The primary reason to utilize delayed financing is that buyers can stay liquid. Investors use delayed financing to recover their cash and be able to purchase another property.

Generally, delayed financing is right for an investor who wants to take advantage of all of the benefits of purchasing a home using all cash. They can often negotiate a lower price, close faster and compete with multiple other buyers. An investor who doesn’t immediately qualify for conventional financing may also opt for delayed financing.

An Investor’s Point of View

In this case, the buyer is an investor and purchases a property using all cash.  The buyer then wants to free-up some cash back to buy another property.

The buyer can then delayed financing to recoup the cash and take a loan out on the new property, utilizing the cash back from the initial transaction!

A Primary Occupancy Borrower’s Point of View

The buyer can also use this option to compete with all-cash buyers and negotiate better terms. Delayed financing can be done as quickly as three weeks after purchasing the property, which is different from a standard “cash-out refinance” transaction, where the borrower must wait six or more months.

How Long Do You Have to Wait to Refinance?

If you’re doing a delayed financing transaction on a property you purchased in the last 6 months, you’re allowed to take cash out immediately without any waiting period.

Under normal circumstances, if you bought a home with a mortgage instead of cash, you have to be on the title at least 6 months before you can take cash out and refinance your home, so delayed financing is a notable exception.

Delayed Financing Qualifications

There are certain qualifications that need to be met in order to qualify for a delayed financing transaction.  Most specifically, the property must have been originally purchased using all cash.

Lenders generally have the following qualifications for this type of transaction:

  • Arm’s Length Transaction: You can’t be related to or have a personal relationship with the seller
  • Closing Documents: Closing statement from the property purchase
  • Proof of Funds: Showing where you got the funds to purchase the property
  • New loan amount can be no more than the actual documented amount of the borrower’s initial investment in purchasing the property plus closing costs.
  • Appraisal: Ordered by the lender and paid for by you, generally $500-plus

There can be more needed and other regulations may apply, but these listed above are most standard.

Although you may have just ordered an appraisal when you originally purchased the property, as mentioned previously, the lender will want to conduct their own appraisal before they approve your loan.

It would be my pleasure to help any borrower with a delayed financing transaction, so don’t hesitate to reach out to me for more information or to get started!

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