Choosing the right loan type is an important part of home buying. There are many different mortgage options available, and each comes with its own set of benefits – including a zero down payment loan option.

Making a good decision about your down-payment is one of the key aspects getting the most value from your home purchase.

The amount you put down will play a large role in your monthly payments, your mortgage rate, and how much home you can qualify for.

For some buyers, making a large down payment makes sense. For others, there are options that require little or no down payment. There is no “good” or “bad” down payment amount. It depends on the buyer’s situation and long-term goals.

For more, check out The Mortgage Reports and Tim Lucas’ article here….

The Chenoa Fund – A Great No-Down Option

100% Home Financing

The Chenoa Fund provides first mortgages to any borrower meeting minimum credit standards. This is not a narrow, limited program for which only a select few borrowers can qualify. There is no first-time home-buyer, income or geographic restrictions or recapture provisions with this particular program.

Borrowers who qualify for a first mortgage may also receive assistance with their down payment.

Second Mortgages

Under FHA guidelines, Chenoa Fund is qualified to provide borrowers with grants or second mortgages to cover the borrower’s 3.5% minimum contribution (down-payment), with rates as low as 0% to help in qualifying.

Borrowers qualifying for an FHA first mortgage through Chenoa Fund can obtain a grant or second mortgage if they have at least a 640 credit score, a 43% debt-to-income ratio, and meet other qualification guidelines.

Contact me for more details…

Other Zero-Down Options

USDA Loans

USDA loans could be the right choice for those who want a home in a suburban or rural area. Find out more here…

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) backs this loan in an effort to promote home-ownership and economic development in less-dense areas.

But don’t let the word “rural” concern you, as its definition is quite generous, per the USDA. Many suburban areas just outside of major metro centers are within USDA home loan boundaries.

USDA loans offer 100 percent financing, so the buyer doesn’t need to put any money down on their home if they don’t want to.

VA Loans

Another popular zero-down loan program is the VA loan. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers this loan program to active military members and veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

VA loans also carry the lowest mortgage rates of any loan type, typically around 0.25% below rates for conventional loans – and no mortgage insurance is required!

Also, a VA loan can be extraordinarily flexible. Lenders allow credit scores down to 620 or lower thanks to strong government backing and the VA utilizes a different debt-to-income calculation. VA loans were created to make home-ownership accessible and affordable for military members and veterans.

Options Between 3% and 5% Down

3% Down Conventional

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac both have low down-payment options where the home-buyer needs only 3% down, making the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio 97. This mortgage option generally requires a credit score of at least 620.

This loan requires private mortgage insurance, but depending on your credit score, the mortgage insurance could be less expensive than that of FHA.

Those looking to keep the home and loan long term might opt for this loan; mortgage insurance automatically drops off when you build 22% equity in the home. FHA mortgage insurance remains for the life of the loan. Also, homeowners must refinance to cancel FHA mortgage insurance.

Because conventional PMI can be cancelled, buyers often opt for it, even when it is more expensive than FHA mortgage insurance.

3.5% Down FHA Loan

One of the most popular low down-payment options is the FHA loan. These mortgages are backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and require a credit score of just 580 and a down-payment as little as 3.5%.

FHA loans require a monthly mortgage insurance premium (MIP) payment. This is FHA’s “brand” of mortgage insurance and serves the same purpose as private mortgage insurance (PMI) on conventional loans. While mortgage insurance of any type means extra cost, it also means the buyer can put less money down and buy a home sooner.

Low down-payments are not the only reason FHA loans are popular.  Because of their lenient credit requirements, debt-to-income ratios, and low down-payment, many home buyers will find that an FHA loan works best for them.

The Next Step

Make sure you find out more by contacting your local mortgage professional and working on pre-qualification. It would be my pleasure to do just that!